Dance and performance residency takes centre stage in 2020

By Caselberg Trust | Posted: Wednesday December 18, 2019

Caselberg Trust Creative Connections resident 2020 Lucy Marinkovich

Lucy Marinkovich for Footnote Dance Company — Dean Zillwood


The Caselberg Trust announced today that for the first time in its eight-year history its Creative Connections Resident 2020 will be a dance and performance practitioner. Lucy Marinkovich is a Wellington based freelance dance artist and choreographer who has recently completed a residency in New York as the 2019 recipient of the Arts Foundation Harriet Friedlander New York Residency award winner.

Lucy is the Artistic Director of award-winning dance theatre company Borderline Arts Ensemble, has been the Dance Educator for the Royal New Zealand Ballet, danced for Footnote New Zealand Dance and The New Zealand Dance Company, worked as a freelance choreographer and rehearsal director on a wide variety of projects, as well as completing residencies in Singapore, Malaysia, Spain and Croatia in recent years.

Whilst on her Creative NZ sponsored 3 month Caselberg Trust Creative Connections residency in 2020 Lucy will be working on a project titled “Tomorrow Was Another Day”, which will be a solo dance show in which the audience is invited to join a lone albatross as it adventures across an incomprehensibly vast oceanic realm. Through a narrative that explores the subterranean crevices of human thought, feeling, and the subliminal mind, a beguiling albatross will take you on a phantasmagorical journey of movement, imagery and soundscape.

Lucy says “Tomorrow Was Another Day is inspired by the pantheon of epic literary works with aquatic narratives and arrogant protagonists. Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s “Rime of the Ancient Mariner” is the literary epitome whereby an act of hubris consequently throws everyone overboard. While most fictional oceanic tales champion the protagonist’s ambition and thirst for adventure, I am interested in the Mariner’s melancholy themes of regret, guilt and grief. On the deepest level I seek to explore and communicate an artistic allegory for the climate crisis, and I hope to express this through the fragile beauty of birds.”

As part of her residency Lucy will also be working with the students of Broad Bay School by holding a series of dance classes and art workshops. Through the dance classes she will seek to explore avian and marine-inspired movements with the children, including flocking patterns, and share how a dance is made through this collaborative process.

Making dance and performance accessible for all is a passion of Lucy’s, and this was recognised in 2018 when she was part of the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s Education Team who received a Te Putanga Toi Arts Access Award, “Highly Commended: Creative New Zealand Arts For All Award 2018”. This was for its programme of accessible events making ballet accessible to people who might not otherwise get the chance to experience it.


The 3 month long Caselberg TrustCreative Connections residency is specifically targeted for projects that reach out and make links across a variety of creative media, and professional disciplines, and/or to communities relevant to the planned project. Previous Creative Connections Residents have been Megan Jane Campbell (2012), Pacific Underground (2013), Alex Taylor (2015), Becky Cameron (2016), Victoria McIntosh (2017), Justin Spiers (2018), and Bridget Reweti (2019).

The Caselberg Trust purchased the Broad Bay, Dunedin home of the late John and Anna Caselberg in 2006, with the aim of hosting creative residencies in the house. Since inception, the Trust has held a variety of creative projects and events, as well as hosting several well-known New Zealand writers and artists at the cottage.

Please contact Trustee Robert West at info@caselbergtrust.org or mobile 027 608 0641 for further information, or www.caselbergtrust.org.

Further information regarding Lucy Marinkovich – mobile 027 422 6364, email borderlineartsensemble@gmail.com, and websites https://www.lucymarinkovich.com http://www.borderlinearts.com



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